At John Planck, we like to think of ourselves as historians who look towards the future of our trade–it’s why our customers trust us with helping them make the right architectural hardware decisions. Ironmongery has its own story to tell, so with this in mind, we thought we’d give a hat tip to our profession’s beginnings.

We’ve come a long way since the Iron Age, which started around 1200-600 B.C.E. Back then, local blacksmiths were charged with creating all things iron, ranging from weaponry to tools to household items. Over the years, especially during the Medieval period, blacksmithing became more common. Just before the Industrial Revolution (pre-1750), regional styles started to appear, and each area of the UK had its own look and feel. Few pieces remain from this era, and those that do should be treated with the utmost care.

The Georgian Era (1750-1830) is when iron goods started to be mass produced, but still remained regionally identifiable. Styles began to change rapidly in the Victorian Era (1830-1900), depending on the whims of the tastemakers of the time. Catalogues and pattern books also appeared at this time, making it easier for customers to choose and order their items while still being able to touch and feel sample products in person.

Here at John Planck, we are able to reproduce Georgian and Victorian Era architectural hardware by taking advantage of 21st Century technology. Rochester Cathedral, which dates back all the way to 604C.E. and has since been renovated multiple times, is a great example of our ability to match existing historical hardware. By producing high-quality rendered drawings of specific pieces, we can then use 3D printers to generate rapid prototypes. With these prototypes, we can test to make sure the design fits exactly with your project before sending it to be manufactured by our dedicated foundries. Our process is the perfect blend of history and modernity.

 

If you have a project you’d like to talk to us about, give us a call at 01634 829 249